How are memories preserved by those who did not experience them directly? I paint, draw, and inscribe as a means to inquire, sort, and remember. Searching for entry to a generation of familial memory that is not mine, I strive for connection but am met with distance. 
This body of work directly investigates my grandparents' experience as Polish Jews during World War II. Many of their stories are lost to me, because of physical distance, time, and language barriers. As I sort through their photos, letters, and notebooks, I become aware of the displacement of memory and how seemingly mundane moments intersect with unimaginable horror. I am interested in this transmission of memory from one generation to the next; my work becomes a direct record of this search for access. Through the act of making, I am now able to spend time with my subjects.
"PLAN DES WOHNGEBIETS DER JUDEN", graphite and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 45" x 36", 2019

Letter to Eran, 1989​​​​​​​, colored pencil, charcoal, and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 22" x 15", 2019

Untitled (names of his relatives who died), charcoal, graphite, and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 15" x 22", 2019

charcoal and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 14" x 22", 2019

Miklachat, 1945​​​​​​​, colored pencil, charcoal, and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 15" x 22", 2019

San Marco Square, 1945, graphite and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 30" x 22", 2019

It was Rechov Rembrandt and then Modigliani Street​​​​​​​, graphite and oil paint on Arches Oil Paper, 30" x 22", 2019

detail

Back to Top